STFU Moffat

Because some people shouldn't be allowed to have their shit left unquestioned.

Before we get any questions like "If you hate Doctor Who so much you can just stop watching!":

We don't hate DW or Sherlock, in fact we really really like those shows. That is why we're being critical. If we didn't like them, we wouldn't be nearly as annoyed, we'd simply change channels.

Before you send us asks, please read our FAQ
Asker dlgn13 Asks:
To the previous asker: you probably didn't realize this, but "dumb" is an ableist slur and it would be best if you tried not to use it. Thanks.
stfu-moffat stfu-moffat Said:

You’re right, thanks for pointing that out.

- C

 submitted to :

I saw a table that showed how POCs in speaking roles have gone down since Moffat took over. Also Sherlock is set in London one of the most diverse cities in the world and yet it has only 1 charecter of colour. And she’s a minor background charecter we’re supposed to hate. It’s really ridiculous how Moffat gets away with this shit!

I know! I live in London and I was shocked when I saw how few people of colour were on the show. It’s appalling that in a show set in modern London the cast is nearly all white, and we’re meant to hate Sally anyway (for disliking someone who humiliates her in front of her colleagues!). 

- C

 asked :

I don’t see how Sherlock’s mother leaving work to look after her children is sexist? That’s what many women do. I’m not attacking at all, I just don’t think that it’s sexist to say that women leave work to look after children when it’s an accurate portrayal.

In this case, it was because of Moffat’s history of idolising mothers while reducing women with children solely to their motherhood. If Sherlock’s mother gave up work to look after children*, but there were other examples of mothers who weren’t defined by their children (or, in Amy’s case, having their plot reduced entirely to their womb for a season), it wouldn’t matter as much, because she would be a single example of a mother who (in this case) chooses to focus on her children instead of her career. But Moffat routinely reduces his female characters with children to their motherhood (most obviously Nancy and the mother from the Christmas special), which is a sexist pattern.

- C

*Although there’s no reason why she could never, ever do anything else again. Sherlock and Mycroft are adult men, and it’s very common for women to return to work once their children need less constant care. Mrs Holmes could have written books or started her own business, for example, and it doesn’t seem like Sherlock’s father wants or needs to have someone looking after him. Leaving work to look after children isn’t a binary state.

awfulsound:

stfu-moffat:

 asked :

How do I cite your information?

That’s an interesting question. I googled APA guidelines* on referencing webpages (which I think is what you mean but sorry if it isn’t and this post is useless to you) and found this, which is a guide of how to reference webpages without an author. We don’t really use titles, which makes things tricky, but you could give it a title based on the URL, e.g. the recent(ish) ask about Daleks, you might reference as:

Askashapeshifter Asks STFU-Moffat. (2014.) Retrieved April 21, 2014, from http://stfu-moffat.tumblr.com/post/81414789927/askashapeshifter-asked-stfu-moffat-also-what

But I am not an academic and honestly I have no idea. If people are referencing us frequently we could add titles to longer posts, maybe? I don’t know, if anyone has better suggestions please jump in.

- C

*Solely because my degree was in Psychology and I have no idea how to reference anything for other subjects. 

try purdue OWL for MLA:

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/08/

A Listserv, Discussion Group, or Blog Posting

Cite Web postings as you would a standard Web entry. Provide the author of the work, the title of the posting in quotation marks, the Web site name in italics, the publisher, and the posting date. Follow with the medium of publication and the date of access. Include screen names as author names when author name is not known. If both names are known, place the author’s name in brackets. Remember if the publisher of the site is unknown, use the abbreviation n.p.

Editor, screen name, author, or compiler name (if available). “Posting Title.” Name of Site. Version number (if available). Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (sponsor or publisher). Medium of publication. Date of access.

e.g. 

Salmar1515 [Sal Hernandez]. “Re: Best Strategy: Fenced Pastures vs. Max Number of Rooms?” BoardGameGeek. BoardGameGeek, 29 Sept. 2008. Web. 5 Apr. 2009.

Thank you! :-)

- C

 asked :

If you go to MedievalPOC’s tumblr and go to their FAQ, the second question is about citing tumblr blogs. :D

Thanks! I think their link is MLA format, if that helps :-).

- C

 asked :

How do I cite your information?

That’s an interesting question. I googled APA guidelines* on referencing webpages (which I think is what you mean but sorry if it isn’t and this post is useless to you) and found this, which is a guide of how to reference webpages without an author. We don’t really use titles, which makes things tricky, but you could give it a title based on the URL, e.g. the recent(ish) ask about Daleks, you might reference as:

Askashapeshifter Asks STFU-Moffat. (2014.) Retrieved April 21, 2014, from http://stfu-moffat.tumblr.com/post/81414789927/askashapeshifter-asked-stfu-moffat-also-what

But I am not an academic and honestly I have no idea. If people are referencing us frequently we could add titles to longer posts, maybe? I don’t know, if anyone has better suggestions please jump in.

- C

*Solely because my degree was in Psychology and I have no idea how to reference anything for other subjects. 

If you’re a boy writer, it’s a simple rule: you’ve gotta get used to the fact that you suck at writing women and that the worst women writer can write a better man than the best male writer can write a good woman. And it’s just the minimum. Because the thing about the sort of heteronormative masculine privilege, whether it’s in Santo Domingo, or the United States, is you grow up your entire life being told that women aren’t human beings, and that women have no independent subjectivity. And because you grow up with this, it’s this huge surprise when you go to college and realize that, “Oh, women aren’t people who does my shit and fucks me.”

And I think that this a huge challenge for boys, because they want to pretend they can write girls. Every time I’m teaching boys to write, I read their women to them, and I’m like, “Yo, you think this is good writing?” These motherfuckers attack each other over cliche lines but they won’t attack each other over these toxic representations of women that they have inherited… their sexist shorthand, they think that is observation. They think that their sexist distortions are insight. And if you’re in a writing program and you say to a guy that their characters are sexist, this guy, it’s like you said they fucking love Hitler. They will fight tooth and nail because they want to preserve this really vicious sexism in the art because that is what they have been taught.

And I think the first step is to admit that you, because of your privilege, have a very distorted sense of women’s subjectivity. And without an enormous amount of assistance, you’re not even going to get a D. I think with male writers the most that you can hope for is a D with an occasional C thrown in. Where the average women writer, when she writes men, she gets a B right off the bat, because they spent their whole life being taught that men have a subjectivity. In fact, part of the whole feminism revolution was saying, “Me too, motherfuckers.” So women come with it built in because of the society.

It’s the same way when people write about race. If you didn’t grow up being a subaltern person in the United States, you might need help writing about race. Motherfuckers are like ‘I got a black boy friend,’ and their shit sounds like Klan Fiction 101.

The most toxic formulas in our cultures are not pass down in political practice, they’re pass down in mundane narratives. It’s our fiction where the toxic virus of sexism, racism, homophobia, where it passes from one generation to the next, and the average artist will kill you before they remove those poisons. And if you want to be a good artist, it means writing, really, about the world. And when you write cliches, whether they are sexist, racist, homophobic, classist, that is a fucking cliche. And motherfuckers will kill you for their cliches about x, but they want their cliches about their race, class, queerness. They want it in there because they feel lost without it. So for me, this has always been the great challenge.

As a writer, if you’re really trying to write something new, you must figure out, with the help of a community, how can you shed these fucking received formulas. They are received. You didn’t come up with them. And why we need fellow artists is because they help us stay on track. They tell you, “You know what? You’re a bit of a fucking homophobe.” You can’t write about the world with these simplistic distortions. They are cliches. People know art, always, because they are uncomfortable. Art discomforts. The trangressiveness of art has to deal with confronting people with the real. And sexism is a way to avoid the real, avoiding the reality of women. Homophobia is to avoid the real, the reality of queerness. All these things are the way we hide from encountering the real. But art, art is just about that.

Junot Diaz speaking at Word Up Bookshop, 2012 (via clambistro)

Once at a festival I went to a discussion panel with sci-fi writers and someone asked them how they would write a pregnant character. 

And all three of the male panellists said that they couldn’t, because they literally couldn’t even begin to put themselves in the position of being pregnant. 

These are sci-fi writers. They make their living writing about space lizards from Mars, or alien invasions, or futuristic dystopia where everyone breathes through their fingers or whatever

Their entire function is to write unimaginable, crazy, out-there stuff. That is the whole point of their existence. And they couldn’t even try to imagine what it would be like to be pregnant. It’s seen as this inherently and totally mysterious female thing, that no man can ever even think of representing, even though as men they write things that none of them have ever or will ever experience. 

It made me realise - In the world of sci-fi fiction, alien experiences are more human than women’s experiences. 

(via reasonsforfeminism)

(via reasonsforfeminism)

have you ever equated female to having a vagina and/or breasts or being male to having a penis/pecs/testicles? you’ve contributed to transphobia.

have you ever said anything about men not being able to have periods? you’ve contributed to transphobia.

have you ever laughed at a “man in a dress” joke? you’ve contributed to transphobia.

have you ever invaded a space meant for trans people? you’ve contributed to transphobia.

have you ever invalidated someone’s gender? you’ve contributed to transphobia.

have you ever compared the systematic oppression trans people face every day to a few blogs online that poke fun at cis people and point out what cis people have done to trans people? you’ve contributed to transphobia.

have you ever said or did anything that suggested that being gay was a method of birth control? you’ve contributed to transphobia.

just because you’re not openly hateful towards trans people doesn’t at all mean that you aren’t transphobic or that you don’t contribute to transphobia on a daily basis.

But confusingly, misogynists are sometimes men who speak softly and eat vegan and say “a woman’s sexual freedom is an essential component to her liberation. So come here.” It’s a tricky world out there. And while I’d prefer a critical approach to gender from men I elect, read and even bed, in my experience, the so-called feminist men I’ve met deep down have not been less antagonistic or bigoted toward women. What I see over and over again is misogyny in sheep’s clothing, and at this point, I would rather see wolves as wolves.
Being a critical fan means that you love a famous human being, knowing fully well they are flawed and can make mistakes due to their privilege-blindness or outright ignorance (whether knowingly or unknowingly practicing misogyny, transphobia, homophobia, ableism, racism, etc.). When they fuck up, it is your duty as a critical fan to make them better, call them out and educate them. Your job is not to create excuses and adamantly defend their mistakes because they are so fierce in your eyes.